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FAQ

How can one find the grave of a family member?
The first step is to figure out where the person died. The farther back in history you go the less likely the body was shipped to another location, especially before trains.If you can find a death certificate, it will usually have a “burial” section toward the bottom of the page. Go to findagrave.com and search for the cemetery. Then search for the person’s memorial within the cemetery.If the death certificate doesn’t have a “burial” section or it isn’t filled out or you can’t find a death certificate for the person go to findagrave.com or one of the other grave websites. Findagrave has a search you can use. It works better if you know the cemetery but there are millions of memorials on the site including many little cemeteries throughout the world.Findagrave may have a photo of the gravestone. It will, however, contain a transcription of the information on the stone. There may be memorials for people even if the grave doesn’t have a stone.
How do I find out someone's cause of death?
Death certificates are a matter of public record. Go to the court house of the county where the person resided (or maybe died) and explain to the clerk who you need death certificate for, where they resided or died, and the date of their death. You may have to pay a nominal fee. They will most likely direct you to their computer data base. If you are not marginally computer savvy, take someone with you who is. Then, if you want a copy, you will have to go back to the clerk , pay another small fee, and they will give you a copy then and there.If you live too far away to go the the county court house, then call them and ask them what to do. The cause of death will be written on the death certificate. It can be changed from the initial call to something else, so be sure and check to see if there is an amended certificate.PS. I just read the answers and see that this varies from state to state. What I wrote is true for California and Colorado. To see how your state handles the death certificate, call the county courthouse in the relevant county. You can google this.
I have friends from the South that adamantly argue that there were black regiments fighting for the Confederacy. Is that true?
Once upon a time in a land that was not very far away a US president decided to wage war against the southern states of America.Using a trivial casus belli as an excuse he deployed Storm Troopers of the 101st airborne who faced down the troops of the ANG and then fixed bayonets prior to storming the local school.​​​​​​That president was Eisenhower and of course by "storming the school" I mean the soldiers escorted seven children to school. But they really did have to fix bayonets and face down the Arkansas National Guard.​​​​​​​​Realising that they lost yet another war certain gentlemen, I'll call them Mr Lost CauseS , and his Son, O.T. Confederate opted to change tactics, so they ditched their long time buddies Karl K. Knap and Jim Crow.They decided that the best way to rehabilitate the perception that they were a bunch of angry, hate filled, bigots was to "prove" that the people their ancestors supposedly owned as "slaves" liked being human chattel. That they didn't just like being slaves, they loved being slaves so much that they volunteered to fight and die for their right to be owned! Enter Mr B. Token.So Mr Lost Causes and his Son, O.T. Confederate bestowed the title of Historian on themselves and went about searching for tombstones and pictures. Every time they found a tombstone of a "negro" who happened to die during the period of of the civil war they retroactively conscripted him as a Black Confederate. They even abducted entire regiments of African Americans who were Union soldiers.​​Black Confederates (ignore fact they're wearing Union uniforms)​​This is a perfect example of how "historians" conscript African Americans into the Confederate army. This death certificate use to be commonly cited as proof of black Confederate soldiers and it convinced many people. Jacob Spellman was born in North Carolina in 1846, he was clearly marked as being a "colored" American and it's also noted that he was a soldier.BAM we got us a Black Confederate!We even have his service paper proving he enlisted as a private in Feb 1865 in the North Carolina 14th USCHA regiment which was right about the time period when the CSA legally allowed for the conscription of "negroes".​But there is only one problem, the North Carolina 14th United States Colored Heavy Artillery was a Union regiment formed from freemen. They were definitely blacks, they came from a Confederate state but they fought for the United States of America.Or take this​This is the tombstone of Wade Childs. Looking at this you would probably see the CSA engraving and think he was a soldier. Except he wasn't, he was a "body slave" who served a Confederate soldier. His original tombstone was "lost" and needless to say his great great... great grandkids were somewhat surprised to find out that grandpappy had been drafted…​When this picture 1st surfaced it was cited as an original source. It still gets pretty good circulation but there is just a tiny little problem.​​The original popped up and the guy to the left is a Union officer and those "Black Confederates" turned out to be Union volunteers from Philadelphia.This pattern repeats itself over and over. From known slaves whose masters forced them to wear uniforms during pictures to fake tombstones to even worse, real tombstones of real men. Real men who fought and died for the Union only to be forced to fight for the Confederacy in death.I find the Myth of the Black Confederate to be particularly loathsome. The American Civil War was a large conflict and it's very possible that there was at least one black man who of his own accord fought for the CSA, stranger things have happened. We know that even the SS had at least one Jew, although Hitler personally made him an honorary Aryan. (I'm dead serious you can't make this shit up.)Edit. It seems that the question I was answering was merged into this one. Some of the material posted here made more sense in the context of the original question that was about individual soldiers vs units.
When a transgender person dies, does the coroner fill out the death certificate under their natal sex or gender identity?
In Spain, there has generally been a push to simplify the process of legally changing your government identified gender. It no longer requires that you have medical surgery to “change” your biological gender appearance. You generally need a psychologist or psychiatrist to make a statement that you have gender dysphoria, that this condition has existed for a while and is not going away. The process has also been opened up to minors. As part of the process to get your official documents changed, you can get a legal name change including last name if I recall correctly. This process of name changing is generally otherwise next to impossible to legally do in Spain.Once the process is complete, you are identified by that gender across all your government documents. You have a full legal entitlement to be referred to as that gender, and you can lodge complaints with the government about discrimination should you be intentionally misgendered. I’ve looked around for specific documents referring to death certificates issued in Spain, and issues for trangeneros and transexuales. I just cannot find anything in any BOE that specifically addresses this narrow point. The best I can find are anti-discrimination laws related to health that says you cannot be discriminated against for any health services you request, and you’re legally entitled to all health services for your gender. (This is on top of other services that are often offered on the local government level specifically for trangenero and transexual individuals in assistance with transitioning.)Death certificates in Spain can be requested for the purposes of rectifying the sex of a deceased individual. In requesting a death certificate, gender is not a field. (And they have both mother/proginator 1, father/proginator 2 on their for the deceased person’s parents. Gender neutral and gendered for the parents.) The 2021 law that I found about sex on death certificates says the wording was changed to sex at birth, where it was originally just sex. (But this sex at birth is changed if you go through the legal process to change your registered gender is my recall.)The issue is it is unclear how many people have taken advantage of this and how many have not. An ein 2021 put the number of people going through the process at around 3,000 but that many more were likely to have gender dysphoria but have taken no steps to address this through channels. There were 800 people in Madrid in 2021 who took advantage of the law to seek to get their gender changed on their government ID. Spanish sources appear to indicate that around only a third of transgender individuals are out. Many fear getting the legal name and gender change and perceived finality of the decision as it relates to transphobia and legality of being your identified gender: there is no backing out at that point.This gray zone area is not adequately addressed to explain fully the legal consequence for the gender on a death certificate of someone who has not started going through the transition process for whatever reason. I am under the cultural impression that the death certificate holds less cultural and legal significance in Spain than in a place like USA, which may explain the lack of info.
What is your craziest US immigration experience?
As many of you know, the process of acquiring a student visa (F-1 visa) to the United States is nerve-racking for Indian families. Having gone through four years of college, graduating with a good GPA along with multiple summer research stints/internships, then applying to several US universities at considerable expense, and finally being rewarded with an acceptance letter from a respected school, Indian students are sometimes rejected from entering the US at the final hurdle—the visa interview at the US embassy.I recall the buildup to my interview four years ago. Many of my friends had theirs scheduled before mine, and they scared the bejeezus out of me recounting their horror show interviews involving scores of questions from grim interviewers with piercing glares boring into their souls trying to catch out any hesitation in their answers, any possible untruths.My parents did what any self-respecting Indian family does before their kid heads to an interview—they took me to a temple. And not just any temple—they took me about 1000 kilometers north of home to the searingly hot city of Baroda, Gujarat, to visit one particular Hanumanji temple (apparently this was our family God in our family temple, goodness knows why, we’re Tamils from Chennai—and I’m an atheist!)So after much prayer and puja, blessings from family members and well-wishes from friends, I stood outside the US embassy on a cloudy, muggy, summer day, shitting my pants under the narrow canopy that automatically opened over the street when it rained (a nice touch there, ‘Murica).My stomach churned as the line slowly moved forward. My heart leaped into my mouth as I passed through the gates, only to be confronted by armed security guards who proceeded to take away anything I had in my pockets—pens, coins, paper, etc.Please don’t take my clothes too, please don’t take my clothes too, I prayed silently.The guard gestured at my jeans. Resigned to my fate, I started to unzip them.“What are you doing?” he asked, amazed. “Just take off your belt and pass through the scanner.”….Finally through the gates, I was taken aback at how simple the next room looked. Then I understood why—it was just a queue room. A room for this damn queue.Half an hour later we passed into the Interview Room. People lined up in front of about a dozen booths, each with a White Man or White Lady inside (must be the Americans, I thought fearfully, please let them understand my accent).The room was air-conditioned. I was sweating.It was large and airy. I gasped for breath.Now I was in front of one of the White Men. He beckoned me forward.He smiled at me evil‡ no, pleasantly ‡ it was a pleasant smile!“Hi there, how’s your day going?”He greeted me ‡ what do I do? Is this part of the interview? Oh no, I don’t have an answer. Smile. Smiling is good. He won’t hate you if you smile.I smiled. He waited.Oh shit, he asked you a question. Answer it, jackass!“OH IT IS—you’re too loud, dolt—going well”, I whispered.He didn’t hear that last bit, but he nodded as if he did.“May I have your I-20?”“Here it is,” I breathed.He stared down at it for a minute. Then—“So, you’re going to Purdue?”Say yes, don’t say yup. And don’t shout.“YUP!” I shouted.“Ok then, you’re good to go” he said, stamping my passport.“What?” I yelped, staring at him in disbelief.“You’re good to go, sir, your application has been accepted.”You mean after all that stress you didn’t ask me a single question? Not one? Why?? Are you crazy, man? I even lied about my day, it was shitty as hell, you should quiz me on it! Make me grovel for that visa, like the bastards I know you interviewers are!“Good luck with your PhD, Mr.Raman, and enjoy your stay in the United States of America.”“Thank you,” I replied, my throat catching.I was going to America courtesy this senile interviewer. Thank you Hanumanji!